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When TV Logos Were Physical Objects

It goes without saying that nearly everything made with graphic design and video software was once produced using a physical process—from newspapers to TV Logos. But some TV stations and film studios took things even further and designed physical logos that were filmed to create dynamic special effects. Arguably the most famous of which is MGM’s Leo the Lion which first appeared in 1916 and would go on to include 7 different lions over the decades.

Recently, television history buff Andrew Wiseman unearthed this amazing behind-the-scenes shot of the Office de Radiodiffusion Télévision Française logo from the early 1960s that was constructed with an array of strings to provide the identity with a bright shimmer that couldn’t be accomplished with 2D drawings. The logo could also presumably be filmed from different perspectives, though there’s no evidence that was actually done.

Another famous physical TV identity was the BBC’s “globe and mirror” logo in use from 1981 to 1985 that was based on a physical device. The rotating globe was recorded live using the Noddy camera system and the color was created by adjusting the contrast.

One of the more elaborate physical TV intro sequences was the 1983 HBO intro that, despite giving the impression of being animated or created digitally, was in fact, built almost entirely with practical effects. You can watch a 10 minute video about how they did it below. (via QuipsologiesRedditAndrew Wiseman)

Original post by Christopher Jobson

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